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Raclette Vs. Ogleshield

Raclette Vs. Ogleshield

Raclette is a Swiss cheese dish, a cultural landmark, the name of a cheese, a table top appliance, a dining experience, a good time.

The word 'raclette' comes from the French verb racler, meaning to scrape. It's an allusion to the way in which the melted cheese is scraped from the half-wheel once it's been held up to a grill. 


The history is that shepherds would carry the cheese with them, then melt it by their campfires and scrape the melted bit off onto bread. But this cheese – and the dish it lends its name to – has a rich history that begins in the heart of the Alps, where it was invented as a way to warm up after a long day on the snowy slopes.

Raclette originates in Wallis, Switzerland, and is traditionally thought to be more than 400 years old. 

Back in the day, Swiss shepherds from the French speaking Valais region needed to bring food up to the Alps that was relatively cheap and wouldn’t spoil easily in the hot summer months. So they brought cheese and potatoes. While the potatoes roasted in the fire, a big piece of cheese was put close to the fire. Once it started melting the cheese was taken away and scraped off the cheese onto the baked potatoes. This was not only filling and nourishing but also delicious. 

Enter Ogleshield 

The West Country’s answer to Raclette, Ogleshield is a gentle yet complex cheese, with a sweet and milky aroma and warm, savoury flavour reminiscent of chicken broth. The texture beneath the pungent pink rind is soft and pliant, with a beautiful melting quality. 

Developed over the last ten years or so, Ogleshield is made using the creamy, rich milk from the Montgomery’s herd of Jersey cows.  

What does Ogleshield mean?

Ogleshield cheese was originally called Jersey Shield and had a natural rind. William Oglethorpe – then senior cheese maturer at Neal's Yard Dairy – came up with the idea of washing the cheese with a brine solution in order to better mature it, and, in recognition of his contribution, his surname was incorporated into its name.

The cheese is washed with a special brine every three days to achieve a slightly pungent, moist rind which softens the cheese and gives it an extra depth of flavour, this is where you get the nutty almost meaty flavours from.  A superb Westcountry equivalent to Raclette, it cooks and melts brilliantly. We have added it to our toasties, its part of our secret fondue cheese mix & melted on top of fries at festivals.

Above all makes the ultimate Raclette experience.

 

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